Shopping for Comics in Portland

One of the best jobs I ever had was during my brief stint of Southern California living when I worked at a locally-owned comic book shop in San Diego called Comics-N-Stuff. My co-workers were great, the clientele was fun and interesting, and the excitement of receiving each week’s shipment of new comics for the shop brought out the kid in me that my young adult self was so desperately trying to leave behind.

Now that I’m firmly in adulthood, I see the value of never letting go of those things that make you feel young, alive, and inspired. For some, that may be comic books. And although comics were never a big part of my life after I left that job, there were a few that really resonated with me. My own children definitely love their age-appropriate comics, but I’ve learned that most comics today actually have a target audience of teens through grown adults. If you’re not familiar with comic books other than the superhero blockbusters of your youth, I encourage you to check out the seemingly endless variety of modern comics. Many have interesting, complex concepts and themes, a myriad of styles of artwork,  and there are many genres to choose from (not just humor as their name suggests). If you don’t know where to start, just ask one of the knowledgeable employees at any of these amazing Portland comic book shops and they’ll be more than happy to help. For the rest of you that already know what you want and love, what are you waiting for?! Hop on a bus and get yourself to one of Portland’s many comic book shops.


Websites for each location are listed below and should be referenced for store hours and further details on each shop’s specialty. Also listed are the nearest TriMet stops to each shop. For further trip planning assistance, visit TriMet.org and enter your starting location and the location of your desired shop for a detailed trip itinerary.

Bridge City Comics

3725 N Mississippi Ave, Portland, OR 97227, (503) 282-5484

BridgeCityPhoto by Marie Richie on flickr

“Bridge City Comics is dedicated to fulfilling the needs of comic book enthusiasts in Portland, Oregon! We are firmly committed to expanding the market and educating people about the fun and excitement that goes along with enjoying comic books and graphic novels.”

Visit bridgecitycomics.com

Accessibility:


 

Cosmic Monkey Comics Inc

5335 NE Sandy Blvd, Portland, OR 97213, (503) 517-9050

CosmicComicShopPhoto by Janet Lackey on flickr

“We carry a full selection of new comics, back issues, graphic novels and supplies. Whether it’s that elusive hot new title or obscure back issue from the vaults, we can find it for you. We delight in filling special orders and searching for the issues you need to fill those empty holes in your collection and your soul.”

Visit cosmicmonkeycomics.com

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Excalibur Books & Comics

2444 SE Hawthorne Blvd, Portland, OR 97214, (503) 231-7351

Photo by Christopher Sohler on flickr

“Excalibur comics is the oldest comic book shop in Portland, OR. Excalibur boasts the largest back-stock inventory in the Pacific Northwest, including an impressive collection of Golden and Silver Age comics as well as literally millions of current issues that we diligently keep organized and accessible to our patrons. We also have a wide selection of trade paperbacks, graphic novels, manga, and more!”

Visit excaliburcomics.net

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Floating World Comics

400 NW Couch St, Portland, OR 97209, (503) 241-0227

FloatingWorldPhoto by Joshin Yamada on flickr

“Floating World Comics is a store for people who still like going to stores. We’re a bookstore that just happens to carry the coolest books of all – comics. But also art books, international art magazines, graphic design, illustration, animation, music and movie related items, anything that might serve as inspiration for creative people looking for something new.”

Visit floatingworldcomics.com

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Future Dreams

1847 E Burnside St, Portland, OR 97214, (503) 231-8311

FutureDreamsPhoto by Christopher Sohler on flickr

“We have been a full service Science Fiction and Comic Book Specialty Bookstore for over 35 years. We carry a full line of new items in the field. We also have an extensive supply of back issue comics and magazines, pre-owned paperback and hardcover novels, collectible paperbacks, prints, posters and portfolios, graphic novels, statues and much more.”

Visit futuredreamsbooks.com

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Things From Another World

Portland Store: 2916 NE Broadway St., Portland, OR 97232(503) 284-4693

Milwaukie store: 10977 SE Main St., Milwaukie, OR 97222, (503) 652-2752

ThingsPhoto by Joshin Yamada on flickr

“If you’ve been looking for comic book stores, look no further. Things From Another World is the premier comic book store in the world. Visit one of our four local comic book shops in Oregon and California, or order online and we’ll carefully pack and ship your comics and graphic novels right to your door! No matter what you’re into, TFAW.com is the online comic book store that has just the thing for your collection!”

Visit tfaw.com

Accessiblity to Portland store:

Accessibility to Milwaukie store:


 

Article by Stephanie Paris

Cover photo by Sam Howzit on flickr

How to enjoy your time on the bus.

 

JustinHouk

There are different ways to look at time spent in transit. One view is that commuting by bus can sometimes take longer than it would if commuting by car, and therefore can feel like a waste of time. I personally choose a different view. The time I spend on a bus or train is always productive, in one sense or another, even if it’s just relaxing after a long day. And if you think about it, bus and car both get you from point a to point b, however when you’re driving, that’s all you can accomplish. One of the nice things about commuting by bus is that someone else does the driving. This opens up some extra time in your day to get things done. So which one really is the more efficient use of your time? Below are some things that you can do to be productive, or just pass the time while using public transportation.

Read. Whether it be a novel, magazine, or a website on your electronic device, reading is a fantastic way to pass the time, especially because once you’re at home or work, there are usually other responsibilities that keep you from the luxury of reading.

Knit/Crochet. I can’t tell you how many knitting projects that I’ve started and finished on the bus. It feels so great to be so productive while in transit. Don’t know how to knit? Youtube is a fantastic way to learn how to knit or crochet, where there is a plethora of how-to videos. Click here for an example.

Work/Play on your laptop. A long bus commute can serve as extra time for work or play on your computer. If a wifi connection is needed, many smartphones can also be used as personal wifi hotspots. Click here for a how-to tutorial.

Listen to music. Whether on your smartphone, mp3 player, or portable radio, listening to music can be so enjoyable on the bus. Sometimes it may be the only time you get to really listen without distractions to your favorite band, opera, or podcast. Just remember to keep the volume of your headphones down to a level that doesn’t disturb others.

Meal-plan. I always find that my family and I eat healthiest when I have taken the time to plan our meals for the week. We also waste less food, shop more efficiently, and it ends up being much more economical. You can do it the old fashioned way by bringing along a favorite cookbook and a writing notebook, or just use your smartphone or laptop to look up recipes and make your lists.

Phone or text a friend. I like to reserve actual phone calls for times when the bus isn’t very crowded. I don’t like to be “that person” who’s having a loud conversation that everyone else finds annoying. Use your best discretion and respect other riders. Chatting via text can also be fun and much more private.

Watch a movie. Again, technology wins. Smartphones offer a myriad of ways to view your favorite tv shows and movies. If you are a cable subscriber, there are even smartphone apps that allow you to watch various networks’ programming on your mobile device. Just remember to pack and use your headphones.

Daydream, relax, meditate. A bus commute can often be the one time in the day when you don’t have to do anything. No work, no children to tend to, nothing to do but be with yourself and your thoughts. Take this moment to breathe and relax.

 

Image in post courtesy of Justin Houk on flickr.